Category Archives: general model work

Fallen flags…

…is a term used to refer to railroads of the past that are no more.  The Baltimore and Ohio, Chessie, the Milwaukee Road, the Pennsylvania…alas, sigh, groan…the list is long and includes many once mighty roads that used massive beasts that covered many thousands of miles of track.

The model train hobby has a growing list of hobby magazines that could be considered fallen flags–like the fallen roads, they led the way in their own forms of innovation and design, then fell by the wayside as time and fashion caught up with them and passed them by.  I’ll post the cover shots of them from time to time, starting with this one…Volume 2, number 2, February 1972, the Railroad Modeler magazine…it’s flag fell sometime around 1984…

 photo 06-29-2013120234PM_zpsb7f7ff96.jpg

Inglenook shunting puzzle…

One of those, “Where has the time gone?” moments. While rearranging things in the train room, I realized that I had not looked into my shunting puzzle’s packing case to see if it survived the move, a move that happened almost a year ago…yikes. Thanks to my beloved’s design, the layout survived just fine, losing only the steeple to the church to the many jolts it took along the way. The other buildings are still packed in their places and are just fine. I don’t know that this will be a permanent home but it still works for the time being…

 photo P8300029_zps629d1b02.jpg

Rivarossi Indiana Harbor Belt HO scale 0-8-0 switcher with booster engine on the tender…

Issued in the classic red box era, it interestingly incorporates elements from earlier releases, like the odd “T” shaped coupler on front.  Like the B&O 0-4-0 Docksider, this switcher was reproduced in numbers far beyond the few that ever ran and in road names that never ran them….

Photobucket

Photobucket
The booster engine adds an interesting bit of additional rod action…


…the video highlights the very nice video feature of my new Canon Powershot A4000 IS work camera.  One button change over and the picture is awesome for such a low end camera.

Model Power HO scale Bullet Train in Amtrack paint…

Got this a couple weeks back in a trade with one of the members of a forum I am a part of with the idea of modifying it with close coupling and Favely pantographs.  The idea of Amtrak trying out a Bullet Train over here is not far fetched at all as they tried several different foreign locomotives and trains in the early daze of service.  The weak point on this model is the awful gap between cars…

Photobucket
…it measures out at 8 scale feet.  Three feet is more prototypical but, with 20″ radius curves, would I be able to do it?  Fortunately, it was quite easy, the truck casting literally having the cut line cast into it.  By mounting a stand Kadee #5 box to a small brass strip, I got 3′ of coupling space AND found it can easily traverse my 20″ curves AND not hit freight cars on the adjoining track…Note that I found that a Rivarossi Hudson tender wheelset is a drop in fit.  Being metal, it’s a much better setup for the train…I only need 5 more…sigh…

Photobucket
Here is is, installed and setting on a 20″ curve…

Photobucket
…a side-by-side comparison of the old and new gaps…

Photobucket
…the finished train…

Photobucket

(HO)bbyline HO scale Fairbanks Morse H-10-44 and T.Y.C.O./Mantua 4-6-2 pacific…

…the Pacific is a classic from 1953, the (HO)bbyline diesel from a bit later.  Both have just been thru thorough clean and lubes and were caught taking laps before the Pacific was sent back to its owner, yet another opportunity to run classic, hard to find models on my layout.  I’ll be looking for wheelsets to get rid of the traction tire equipped ones on the H-10-44…this will improve electrical pickup with the addition of wipers to those wheelsets…

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Hobbyline HO scale Fairbanks Morse H-10-44 in Lehigh Valley colors…

…a gift from an online modeler friend. I’ve wanted one of these for awhile, in any form, from any manufacturer. The look is pure brute and the car body was designed by the same guy who did the Pennsy GG1.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


Made in a time when the hobby was less refined…come on, can you imagine the caterwauling from the peanut gallery if Atlas stamped their logo on the SIDE of any of their models. And check out the screw on the top of the hood…shameless, I tell you, shameless…thinking some goob could actually enjoy the hobby with such a blatant display of non-scale hardware. That boxing glove for a coupler actually mates with most knuckle couplers today and was only used by HObbyline on their equipment. It just gets cooler with each inspection…

Photobucket

This torpedo tube is actually a device to eliminate light bleed thru the shell and concentrate it towards the headlight, a rather forward thinking detail that sees little use still today.

Photobucket

Then there’s these giant spur gears in the cab, just waiting to puree some hapless HO scale crew that manages to fall into their clutches.

A great piece of modeling history, it appears to have been offered as part of several sets in 1955 — in Lehigh Valley, C&O and AT&SF paint as a passenger train and in C&O and AT&SF paint in two freight sets. Pennsylvania paint eventually was offered but it wasn’t long afterwards that HObbyline became Bowser and the diesel models stopped, most likely before 1960.

Many thanks buddy…it will be a cherished beastie in my fleet…