Category Archives: odd stuff

Just sayin’…

In the last 32 months, I’ve…

…picked up and moved my family 250 miles…

…driven 90,000+ miles working in my new home state…

…inspected over 15, 000 apartments…

…started a new life on our own little farm out in the country and all that goes with farming, while holding down a full time job that can run 50+ hours a week, with almost half of that behind the wheel…

…I really don’t have anything left for a blog at this moment.  It certainly isn’t for lack of material.

I’ve got some really great stuff going on in my modeling these last 6 months.

Honest…

Meantime, I have got to find me one of these…

 photo 03-04-2013085157PM-640_zps641b9a32.jpg

Hobbyline HO scale Fairbanks Morse H-10-44 in Lehigh Valley colors…

…a gift from an online modeler friend. I’ve wanted one of these for awhile, in any form, from any manufacturer. The look is pure brute and the car body was designed by the same guy who did the Pennsy GG1.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


Made in a time when the hobby was less refined…come on, can you imagine the caterwauling from the peanut gallery if Atlas stamped their logo on the SIDE of any of their models. And check out the screw on the top of the hood…shameless, I tell you, shameless…thinking some goob could actually enjoy the hobby with such a blatant display of non-scale hardware. That boxing glove for a coupler actually mates with most knuckle couplers today and was only used by HObbyline on their equipment. It just gets cooler with each inspection…

Photobucket

This torpedo tube is actually a device to eliminate light bleed thru the shell and concentrate it towards the headlight, a rather forward thinking detail that sees little use still today.

Photobucket

Then there’s these giant spur gears in the cab, just waiting to puree some hapless HO scale crew that manages to fall into their clutches.

A great piece of modeling history, it appears to have been offered as part of several sets in 1955 — in Lehigh Valley, C&O and AT&SF paint as a passenger train and in C&O and AT&SF paint in two freight sets. Pennsylvania paint eventually was offered but it wasn’t long afterwards that HObbyline became Bowser and the diesel models stopped, most likely before 1960.

Many thanks buddy…it will be a cherished beastie in my fleet…

Keyser Model Kits P.O./P.O. Tours 4-6-0 locomotive in HO scale…

…and even all that may be wrong. I have found very little information on this other that the original owner and photographer’s pictures. It will be on its way here shortly to join my growing stash of kits set aside to keep my fingers busy when work runs out. I have found nothing on the net except for a few auction listings and so would appreciate any history out there if you readers would know of it…

Photobucket

Photobucket

Alco Models HO scale Union Pacific ALCO C-855…

…well…the drive train anyway, part of a recent box load of ancient HO history…

Photobucket

Included were these two Lindsay “Teaspoon of Power” drives, the L-140 HO gauge 4 wheel power unit with flywheel and the L-142 single end motor. The little boogers are rated for 1.5 amps, enough to fry three of anything offered today. The L-140 has an ingenious design that allows it to extend its wheelbase .170″ to fit a variety of models. The gear box simply slides along the long end where the flywheel is, then locks in place with a set screw. The flywheel can also be flipped to make for more room as needed.

Photobucket

Intermountain HO scale 33″ replacement wheelsets…


…my product of choice for most of my rolling stock. I try to replace all plastic wheels with metal ones because the metal ones work as they roll to clean the track, just like the real ones.

A short circuit that showed up recently had me momentarily baffled until my alter ego, CAPTAIN OBVIOUS came to the rescue. One of the last cars I converted was an older Athearn 50′ reefer with its original metal sprung trucks. When I lifted the car off the track, all my power was back.

NOTE TO SELF: When installing metal wheelsets, get into the habit of checking the insulated side of the axles to make sure they are all on the same side of the car. That way, self is not inadvertently creating a short circuit through the metal truck…duh. Bonus points are gained by making sure both trucks are insulated on the same side in metal framed kits.

NOTE TO NEWCOMERS: The insulated side is the one done in a non-conductive plastic, usually black. —>Can you believe they used paper or varnish not too long ago? The varnish breaking down over the years is the more likely reason Grandpa’s old trains aren’t working for some right now…that creates a dead short, leaving folks to believe that the motor is toasted.

Photobucket
WRONG WAY

Photobucket
RIGHT WAY

Photobucket